Photos

Photos

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

The Purpose of this Page



News of communities devastated by natural climatic and geologic events seems to be increasing.  The increased density and vulnerability of our built environment exacerbates that devastation.   Thus, reducing that vulnerability will dramatically improve societal resiliency in the face of natural hazards.   

If we can create physical communities that are less susceptible (by location and design) to damage, we can focus our post-event attention on restoring functionality and community spirit, rather than mourning loss of life and paying to rebuild homes and businesses.  It seems simple enough.  The solutions are there.  But implementing them—particularly in some of the most populous and vulnerable places in the world—remains a challenge.   

This web page is intended as a resource to help inform and to inspire safer and less vulnerable human habitation through the geographic integration of science, engineering, economics and public policy. I highlight newsworthy events and case studies; and I seek to share exemplary policies and “best practices” with the goal of improving locational decisions that reduce damage and loss of life from natural events.   

I welcome your input and feedback!

For more about me and what prompted me to begin this blog, please see my first post, here:

It's Elemental

About me...
 
I am currently the director of Capital Planning and Sustainability at the University System of Maryland (USA), where I help coordinate capital budget, facilities and sustainability efforts of the System’s twelve institutions. Previously, I planned campus venues for the 2002 Winter Olympics at the University of Utah, and developed a capital facilities rebuilding program at Yale University. I've  done management consulting, writing and graphic design.  I have a master’s degree in geography (urban planning) and have taught geography, urban economics and environmental planning as an adjunct professor.

No comments:

Post a Comment